sixpenceee
sixpenceee:

ROCKY HILL CEMETERY: THE TOMBSTONE THAT “BLEEDS”
I am unsure about the entire truth, but this is a description according to this website:
"There is a tombstone in Rocky Hill Cemetery that bleeds. The woman it belongs to told her husband if he remarries and his new wife is cruel to her children her tombstone will bleed. They have changed the tombstone several times and the blood keeps coming back. 
They have an inscription in front of her tombstone that reads: This stone is at the grave of a mother who died leaving several small children. It is said that the husband remarried and the stepmother was very cruel to the children.” 

sixpenceee:

ROCKY HILL CEMETERY: THE TOMBSTONE THAT “BLEEDS”

I am unsure about the entire truth, but this is a description according to this website:

"There is a tombstone in Rocky Hill Cemetery that bleeds. The woman it belongs to told her husband if he remarries and his new wife is cruel to her children her tombstone will bleed. They have changed the tombstone several times and the blood keeps coming back.

They have an inscription in front of her tombstone that reads: This stone is at the grave of a mother who died leaving several small children. It is said that the husband remarried and the stepmother was very cruel to the children.” 

neurosciencestuff

neurosciencestuff:

Chinese Doctors Use 3D-Printing in Pioneering Surgery to Replace Half of Man’s Skull

Surgeons at Xijing Hospital in Xi’an, Shaanxi province in Northwest China are using 3D-printing in a pioneering surgery to help rebuild the skull of a man who suffered brain damage in a construction accident.

Hu, a 46-year-old farmer, was overseeing construction to expand his home in Zhouzhi county last October when he was hit by a pile of wood and fell down three storeys.

Although he survived the fall, the left side of his skull was severely crushed and the shattered bone fragments needed to be removed, which has led to a depression of one side of his head.

Due to his injuries, Hu cannot see well out of his left eye, experiences double vision (diplopia) and is also unable to speak and write.

Read more

asylum-art

asylum-art:

Alienation: Upside-Down Portraits Make People Look Like Aliens by Anelia Loubser

Behance | Facebook

This latest photo series by Anelia Loubser, a photographer in Cape Town, reminds us that even the simplest change in perspective can change how things look drastically. By selectively cropping and flipping the dark portraits in her “Alienation” series, Loubser makes basic human portraits look like creepy alien close-ups.

‘Alienation’ is a collection of portraits that challenges the viewer by using creative tactics based on the concept, ‘If you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change’ – Wayne Dyer,” Loubser explains. To see more of her work, as well as the “before” photos she took for this series, visit her Behance profile.

via boredpanda

Watch the video:

likelyhealthy
likelyhealthy:

When Doctors Discriminate

The first time it was an ear, nose and throat doctor. I had an emergency visit for an ear infection, which was causing a level of pain I hadn’t experienced since giving birth. He looked at the list of drugs I was taking for my bipolar disorder and closed my chart.
“I don’t feel comfortable prescribing anything,” he said. “Not with everything else you’re on.” He said it was probably safe to take Tylenol and politely but firmly indicated it was time for me to go. The next day my eardrum ruptured and I was left with minor but permanent hearing loss.
…If you met me, you’d never know I was mentally ill. In fact, I’ve gone through most of my adult life without anyone ever knowing — except when I’ve had to reveal it to a doctor. And that revelation changes everything. It wipes clean the rest of my résumé, my education, my accomplishments, reduces me to a diagnosis.
I was surprised when, after one of these run-ins, my psychopharmacologist said this sort of behavior was all too common. At least 14 studies have shown that patients with a serious mental illness receive worse medical care than “normal” people. Last year the World Health Organization called the stigma and discrimination endured by people with mental health conditions “a hidden human rights emergency.”

This state of affairs is awful.  Our medical programs need to focus more on stigma reduction and inclusion of people living with mental health challenges.  Check out Columbia’s Narrative Medicine program.

likelyhealthy:

When Doctors Discriminate

The first time it was an ear, nose and throat doctor. I had an emergency visit for an ear infection, which was causing a level of pain I hadn’t experienced since giving birth. He looked at the list of drugs I was taking for my bipolar disorder and closed my chart.

“I don’t feel comfortable prescribing anything,” he said. “Not with everything else you’re on.” He said it was probably safe to take Tylenol and politely but firmly indicated it was time for me to go. The next day my eardrum ruptured and I was left with minor but permanent hearing loss.

…If you met me, you’d never know I was mentally ill. In fact, I’ve gone through most of my adult life without anyone ever knowing — except when I’ve had to reveal it to a doctor. And that revelation changes everything. It wipes clean the rest of my résumé, my education, my accomplishments, reduces me to a diagnosis.

I was surprised when, after one of these run-ins, my psychopharmacologist said this sort of behavior was all too common. At least 14 studies have shown that patients with a serious mental illness receive worse medical care than “normal” people. Last year the World Health Organization called the stigma and discrimination endured by people with mental health conditions “a hidden human rights emergency.”

This state of affairs is awful.  Our medical programs need to focus more on stigma reduction and inclusion of people living with mental health challenges.  Check out Columbia’s Narrative Medicine program.